Carriages’ A-Z Wedding Planning Glossary

wedding glossaryWedding planning is hard enough without having to get your head around lots of new words you may never even have heard of.  There’s nothing worse than coming out of a suppler meeting feeling confused and slightly overwhelmed, so if you’re one of the first in your family or friends’  group to get married and are feeling slightly stressed with all the wedding jargon being thrown your way then let us give you a helping hand.

We’ve put together our very own small wedding planning glossary which highlights some essential keywords you’re quite likely to hear.

Allocation A group of rooms reserved exclusively up until 4-6 weeks before the event for your guests at a discounted rate.

Boutonniere A small bunch of flowers pinned to the lapel of a jacket usually worn by men in the wedding party.

Boxing A technique used to neatly fold linen around a square or rectangular table.

Charger A large decorative plate that’s placed under the dinner plate to bring colour and texture to the table.

Corkage A charge made by the venue for opening bottles of alcohol that have been supplied by the client.

Embossing The process of creating a three-dimensional image or design, such as a monogram, on wedding invitations, menus, and thank-you notes.

Emcee (Master of Ceremonies/MC) An individual who moves the wedding reception forward by announcing speakers and entertainment throughout the night.

Favours Small gifts for individual guests that are traditionally edible or creative miniatures to match the wedding theme.

Flatware Eating utensils like forks, knives and spoons.

Flute Glassware used for champagne.

Handle Wrap The ribbon, fabric, or handkerchief that wraps around the stems of the bride’s bouquet.

Head Table A long, straight table set up for the meal during a reception. Typically the bride and groom sit at the center of the table, facing guests, with the bridal party. Traditionally the groom will sit to the right of his bride.

LED A type of light popular for creating a dramatic event atmosphere; acronym for light-emitting diode.

Millinery Fabric or ribbon details used on hats, cakes, or wedding decor.

Officiant An individual in charge of a service or ceremony.

Page A person who holds the train of a bride’s gown when she walks down the aisle. This position is usually fulfilled by a boy under the age of 10 but older than the ring bearer.

Palette Used to describe the range of colours used in your wedding theme. Whether you use one colour or several, the colours used in your wedding make up your palette.

Pax Short for ‘passengers’ and used to show how many people can be accommodated in the ceremony and the reception.

Placecards Printed cards that are placed at each seat at the reception to let guests know which chair they will be sitting at.

Receiving Line The bride, groom and family members stand in line at the wedding to welcome guests and receive their good wishes as guests enter into the function room.

Rigging A temporary suspension or attachment of materials and equipment to a structure means of wires, cords, slings, chains or lifting appliances.

Stationery Suite A term to describe all of the stationery, including the save-the-dates, invitations, reply cards, reception cards, and any other invitation enclosures.

Sweetheart Table A two-person table for the bride and groom.

Tablescape Another word for table arrangements or centrepieces and most often used when each table has multiple components.

Trestle Table A rectangular table commonly 6ft by 2ft or 3ft.

Underlay A full tablecloth that falls to the floor.

Usher A man (or men) selected by the groom whose main responsibility is to seat guests as they enter the ceremony. This task can also fall to the groomsmen.

Vendor A wedding professional who provides a service or product to someone hosting a wedding.

Look out for our Indian Wedding Glossary which we’ll be posting in the forthcoming weeks.

If you require any assistance during your wedding planning journey, call a member of our team on 0116 268 8804 or email enquiries@carriagesevents.co.uk for further information.

 

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